Difference between revisions of "Five in Hendalarsk"

From IxWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
m
m
 
Line 14: Line 14:
  
 
Diplomats abroad have also been granted limited dispensation with regards to the number; as of 1884, it is permissible for diplomats outside the bounds of Hendalarsk to refer to the number as "V", provided that they vocalise it as the letter "V" and not as a number, so as to ease communication with their host countries and/or international organisations.
 
Diplomats abroad have also been granted limited dispensation with regards to the number; as of 1884, it is permissible for diplomats outside the bounds of Hendalarsk to refer to the number as "V", provided that they vocalise it as the letter "V" and not as a number, so as to ease communication with their host countries and/or international organisations.
 +
 +
==Notes==
 +
{{reflist}}
 
[[Category:Hendalarsk]]
 
[[Category:Hendalarsk]]
 
[[Category:Cultural taboos]]
 
[[Category:Cultural taboos]]

Latest revision as of 12:33, 22 May 2020

The cardinal number 5 (Hendalarskisch: sechs-minus-eins or vier-und-eins (6-1 or 4+1), Lechian: pięć) is of enormous religious significance in Hendalarsk and is subject to a great deal of taboo as a result.

Origins

The significance of the number long predates the unification of Hendalarsk itself. Accounts from the era of Hendalarskara romantic nationalism in the later 18th and early 19th centuries often viewed reverence for the number as a kind of predestination, since in its modern borders Hendalarsk encompasses fourplusone major rivers, sixminusone free cities of the Pentapolis and fourplusone main ethnicities; hence, to the nationalists, it was only natural that the number would be the subject of such veneration by Hendalarskaren, since it marked their destiny. The Pentapolitan cultural theorist Wytrosz Manzaster, on the other hand, suggested a more prosaic explanation, noting that the typical human has 10/2 digits on each hand and foot, and consequently concluding that reverence for the number reflected a fascination with corporeality on the part of the early Hendalarskaren:

Despite being inextricably bound to it, our digits represent our only physical interface with the world that surrounds us; in their approach to fourplusone the ancients chose to reflect the great beauty of this most liminal of all the liminalities. There is something simultaneously glorificatory and depraved about our digits, anchoring our spirits to the profane, with the digits themselves instruments of majestic beauty and base sin. In this dialectic, this tension, one may see the genesis of a culture which venerates a numerical expression of this bond while disdaining ever to name it.

Wytrosz Manaster, God in the Sky, God in the Soil: The Pantheistic Legacy in Contemporary Hendalarskara Worship (1983)

Representation

Customs around the number have shifted over time. Thearch Petrus II declared the number "good" in 1635, declaring that its name could be freely spoken by all, since it constitutes "the most blessed" number; he named it 'stedre'[1], while keeping its standard numerical representation of "5". This was denounced as "base and heretical" by the Sixth Council of Frehmenwerth; this council was, ironically, the fourplusoneth in a standard counting system, but was skipped in line with the historical precedent that Petrus II had flouted.

In Lechian areas of the country, where this taboo does not exist, the word pięć is freely used as a verbal representation of the number and is both spoken and written in full. The absence of the sixminusone taboo in Lechian culture is one of its starkest differentiators from mainstream Hendalarskisch culture, and is at the heart of historical disputes concerning figures such as Mikołaj V/VI of Prawobrzeżnawroza.

In contemporary Hendalarsk there are no official legal restrictions on the use of the number, with horizontal social reinforcement the preferred tactic for maintaining the number's sanctity. Moral guidelines on the use of the number are maintained by the Church of Hendalarsk, with studies demonstrating that the vast majority of Hendalarskaren treat these specific edicts with the same social responses as to an enforceable law.

Recent centuries have nevertheless seen some relaxation of the taboo, particularly in scientific and technical fields where it is not practical to exclude a numerical representation of the cardinal concept. Church guidance to germane professions is consequently that the numeric signifier of the number (5) may be freely used in work without resulting in moral or cultural penalty, as is the case with all 'pure' usage such as dates and mathematics, but that vocalising the number directly when speaking Hendalarskisch, even by using an intermediary term such as pięć, remains strictly forbidden in the moral law.

Diplomats abroad have also been granted limited dispensation with regards to the number; as of 1884, it is permissible for diplomats outside the bounds of Hendalarsk to refer to the number as "V", provided that they vocalise it as the letter "V" and not as a number, so as to ease communication with their host countries and/or international organisations.

Notes

  1. The word 'stedre' has no etymological relation to any word in Hendalarskisch, or indeed any word in any known language; it is officially considered 'raving', in line with the decision of the Sixth Council, although a minority of Zweipetrian partisans uphold this name for the number as a divine blessing.