Difference between revisions of "Horse racing in Levantia"

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Many different horse breeds are used in flat racing worldwide, but the Thoroughbred is the most dominant. The races take place on track surfaces suitable for horses. Worldwide, the most common is a natural grass surface, called "turf". In [[Sarpedon]], the most common surface is a harrowed "dirt" surface, often based primarily on a mixture of sand and local soil. Most winter flat races in [[Levantia]] and other parts of the world are run on a synthetic or all-weather surface, generally a blend of sand with synthetic fiber and/or rubber, often coated with wax or a similar substance.  
 
Many different horse breeds are used in flat racing worldwide, but the Thoroughbred is the most dominant. The races take place on track surfaces suitable for horses. Worldwide, the most common is a natural grass surface, called "turf". In [[Sarpedon]], the most common surface is a harrowed "dirt" surface, often based primarily on a mixture of sand and local soil. Most winter flat races in [[Levantia]] and other parts of the world are run on a synthetic or all-weather surface, generally a blend of sand with synthetic fiber and/or rubber, often coated with wax or a similar substance.  
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==Triple Tiara==
  
 
==Urcea==
 
==Urcea==

Latest revision as of 14:26, 14 August 2019

Horse racing is one of the largest spectator sports in Levantia and one of the longest established, with a history dating back to the 1600s. While chariot racing had been popular in ancient Great Levantia, organized, single-horse racing was popular in Sarpedon and imported to Levantia beginning in the 17th century. Studies have indicated that the racing and equine industry employ more than 11 million people throughout the Levantine Union, generating more than $304 billion dollars in direct economic impact.

Horse racing, especially thoroughbred racing, was a sport enjoyed by all, especially since the period of the Aedanicad. According to scholars, "Thoroughbred racing was the rare sport that was trending with both social and economic elites and the lower classes". Horse racing was an enamored sport that was popular for its time in all regions of the Holy Levantine Empire and took a downturn for a while as the economy began to decline following the Red Interregnum. Many racing events were canceled altogether during the Levantine theater of the Great War from 1927 to 1935. The post-war period the rebirth of the horse racing sport as a welcome institution of normalcy, even as the Third Fratricide continued to be fought in Latium, and remains popular today.

Steeplechasing

A steeplechase is a distance horse race in which competitors are required to jump diverse fence and ditch obstacles. Steeplechasing is primarily conducted in Burgundie (where it originated), Caphiria, the United Kingdom, Urcea. The name is derived from early races in which orientation of the course was by reference to a church steeple, jumping fences and ditches and generally traversing the many intervening obstacles in the countryside.

Modern usage of the term "steeplechase" differs between countries. In Burgundie and Urcea, it refers only to races run over large, fixed obstacles, in contrast to "hurdle" races where the obstacles are much smaller. The collective term "jump racing" or "National Hunt racing" is used when referring to steeplechases and hurdle races collectively (although, properly speaking, National Hunt racing also includes some flat races). Elsewhere in the world, "steeplechase" is used to refer to any race that involves jumping obstacles.

Flat racing

Flat racing is a form of horse racing which is run on a level racecourse. It is run over a predetermined distance from 2 furlongs (402 m) up to 3 miles (4,828 m) and is either test of speed, stamina, or both, whilst the skills of the jockey is determined by his ability to restrain the horse or impel it. Flat racing does not require horses to jump over any obstacles such as is required for hurdling or steeplechase. It differs from harness racing where horses are pulling a sulky and wear a harness. While in many countries flat racing is the most common form of horse racing, in Burgundie and Urcea it is used to describe the racing season that comes after the steeplechasing which is traditionally held over the winter period.

Many different horse breeds are used in flat racing worldwide, but the Thoroughbred is the most dominant. The races take place on track surfaces suitable for horses. Worldwide, the most common is a natural grass surface, called "turf". In Sarpedon, the most common surface is a harrowed "dirt" surface, often based primarily on a mixture of sand and local soil. Most winter flat races in Levantia and other parts of the world are run on a synthetic or all-weather surface, generally a blend of sand with synthetic fiber and/or rubber, often coated with wax or a similar substance.

Triple Tiara

Urcea

Burgundie

The various principalities that make up modern Burgundie engaged in horse racing to varying degrees until the 1790s when steeplechasing became ubiquitous across the Kingdom of Latium. Minor, informal races had occurred across the Kingdom prior to this but it become an unofficial sport of the kingdom around this time. As feudalism fell and professional armies rose across the southern portions of Latium, young professional cavalry officers sought ways to train and compete. By the 1810s in the few principalities that could afford a professional cavalry corps were requiring forms of flat racing and steeplechasing as part of military training. This became associated with the dashing appearance of cavalry officers and became associated with the officer class and civilian landowners took up the sport as a demonstration of status. By the 1830s, nobles and generous landowners would gives days off to their tenant farmers on race days and it became a joyous communal holiday. The later half of the 19th century, theSouthern Levantine Mediatization Wars saw the dissolution of the aristocracy and as such their grand estates. This coincided with the industrial revolution in Burgundie, which when combined saw workers flooding into the coastal cities. Horse racing once again became a realm solely for the upper classes and was especially adopted by the captains of industry as they overtook the nobility as the primary gens des mejans in Burgundie. After the Great War and the construction of large public race courses in Burgundie the sport became once again popular with all classes. It was also one of the first legal forms of gambling in Burgundie.

See also