Difference between revisions of "List of equipment of the Armed Forces of Urcea"

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| [[SMGM-9]]
 
| [[SMGM-9]]
 
| {{wp|Automatic grenade launcher}}
 
| {{wp|Automatic grenade launcher}}
| {{wp|25 mm grenadel}}
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| {{wp|25 mm grenade}}
 
|[[Royal and Imperial Army (Urcea)|Royal and Imperial Army]], [[Royal Navy (Urcea)|Royal Navy]]
 
|[[Royal and Imperial Army (Urcea)|Royal and Imperial Army]], [[Royal Navy (Urcea)|Royal Navy]]
 
|2025-present
 
|2025-present

Latest revision as of 15:13, 12 February 2020

The equipment of the Armed Forces of the Apostolic Kingdom of Urcea includes, but is not limited to, weapons, ammunition, vehicles, and attire.

Infantry weapons

Muskets and rifles

Name Type Caliber Branches Years in service Notes Picture
Continental Pattern Service Musket Musket 0.75 inch ball Royal and Imperial Army 1722-1840 First standardized weapon in use by the Royal and Imperial Army British Military Short Land Pattern Musket.jpg
Model 1840 Service Weapon Musket 0.69 inch ball Royal Army, Royal Navy 1840-1862 Last smoothbore musket in use
First purpose-built percussion cap weapon in use
NMAH-ET2012-13954.jpg
Model 1862 Service Weapon Rifled musket 0.58 inch Minié ball Royal Army, Royal Navy 1862-1874 First purpose-built standard rifle Springfield 1861.jpg
Model 1874 Service Weapon/SRM-1 Breech loading rifle .45-70 Royal Army, Royal Navy 1874-1887 First non-muzzle loading standardized weapon
First standardized cartridge small arms weapon
Reclassified as SRM-1 following 1880 equipment designation standardization
SPRINGFIELD MODEL 1873 TRAPDOOR RIFLE WITH BAYONET. Cal. 45-70. SN 77641.jpg
SRM-2 Bolt-action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army 1881-1882 First bolt-action rifle issued
Limited use/production
Infanteriegewehr m-1871 Mauser - Tyskland - kaliber 10,95mm - Armémuseum.jpg
SRM-3 Bolt-action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army 1882 Limited use/production; licensed from Yonderre Repetierstutzer Vetterli 1871.jpg
SRM-4 Lever action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army 1883-1890 Only lever action rifle issued to the infantry on a limited basis
Pulled from infantry use in 1883; remained in cavalry use until 1890
Martini-Henry m1871 - England - AM.032017.jpg
SRM-5 Bolt-action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army 1884 Limited use/production Russian Berdan Type II Model 1870.jpg
SRM-6 Bolt-action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army 1884-1885 Limited use/production; design adapted from Burgundie without permission Fusil Gras M80 1874.jpg
SRM-7 Bolt-action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army, Royal Navy 1885-1887 Limited use/production; remained in Navy use until 1890 Infanteriegewehr m-1888 - Tyskland - kaliber 7,92mm - Armémuseum.jpg
SRM-8 Bolt-action rifle .308 Regal Royal Army, Royal Navy 1887-1903 Licensed from Veltorina; adopted by the Navy in 1890 Gevär försöksmodell 1892 Krag-Jörgensen Norge - Armémuseum.jpg
SRM-9 Bolt-action rifle .324 Royal Royal Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1903-1929 Remained in limited service as a sniper rifle until 1953 Gewehr 98 noBG.jpg
SRM-9C Bolt-action rifle .324 Royal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1929-1939 Remained in Royal Navy service until 1945;
in current ceremonial service
Kar 98K - AM.021488.jpg
SRM-10 Semi-automatic rifle .308 Regal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Air Force 1939-1945 Licensed from Burgundie
Originally in Burgoignesc service as
Lansing-Mitchell Fusil Patron 1939
MAS 49 rifle.jpg
SARM-1 Model 1945 Assault rifle .223 Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1945-1987 StG CETME A2b (1).jpg
SARM-2 Assault rifle .223 Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1987-present Scar L Standard.jpg

Sidearms

Support weapons

Name Type Caliber Branches Years in service Notes Picture
SMPM-3 Submachine gun 9×19mm Parabellum Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1938-1955 German MP wooden stock.jpg
SMPM-3L Submachine gun 9×19mm Parabellum Royal and Imperial Army 1940-1953 Light-weight model of the standard SMPM-3 for paratrooper use MP 40 AYF 3.JPG

Machine guns

Name Type Caliber Branches Years in service Notes Picture
SMGM-1 Machine gun .308 Regal Royal Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Fleet 1892-1917 Licensed from Caphiria Maxim m 1905 Mikkeli 2.JPG
SMGM-2 Machine gun .324 Royal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1917-1939 Gradually supplanted by the SMGM-3 beginning in 1931;
Remained in extensive use in the
Audonia theater of the Great War through 1939
B-M1917MG.jpg
SMGM-3 Machine gun .324 Royal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1931-1959 Machine gun MG 34.jpg
SMGM-4 Heavy machine gun .50 Caliber Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 1940-2021 M2 Browning, Musée de l'Armée (cropped).jpg
SMGM-5 Machine gun .324 Royal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy (Marine Corps only) 1959-2024 BundeswehrMG3.jpg
SMGM-6 Squad automatic weapon .324 Royal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy (Marine Corps only) 1968-present HK 21 LMG LEFT SIDE.jpg
SMGM-7 Heavy machine gun .50 Caliber Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force 2017-present Later developed into the SMGM-9; can be converted into the SMGM-9 in the field XM312-04.jpg
SMGM-8 Machine gun .324 Royal Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy (Marine Corps only) 2022-present SMGM8.png
SMGM-9 Automatic grenade launcher 25 mm grenade Royal and Imperial Army, Royal Navy 2025-present Variant of SMGM-7; can be converted into the SMGM-7 in the field XM307-02.jpg

Artillery

Armored vehicles

Tanks

Prior to the deployment of SAV-5 and full armored divisions trained for use with it, the Royal and Imperial Army obtained a number of tanks - mostly of foreign design - and intended to use them as "mobile pillboxes" along the border, mostly to prevent surprise incursions into Urcean territories by Derian nationalists in the first years of the Great War. These tanks were primarily licensed from other nations in Levantia, and none of them were especially mobile or suitable for maneuver warfare. Observations of foreign conflicts, a new generation of military thinkers, and advancement in military technology moved Urcean thought away from the mobile defense notion towards a more modern understanding of the applicability of armored vehicles. The predecessors of the SAV-5 would remain in defensive service through the early years of the 1930s before the full potential of armor became clear.

Tank name Type Main armament Years in service Notes Picture
SAV-1 Light tank 37 mm gun 1922-1933 Very limited production;
Licensed from Burgundie
FT 17.jpg
SAV-2 Light tank 4-6x .324 Royal machine guns 1922-1932 First tank of Urcean design to enter service with the Royal and Imperial Army SchneiderReplica.jpg
SAV-3 Heavy tank 47 mm gun 1925-1931 Very limited production;
Licensed from Yonderre
IWM-KID-109-Vickers-Independent.jpg
SAV-4 Medium tank 47 mm gun 1927-1933 Very limited production;
Licensed from Yonderre
Medium Mk III tank IWM KID 4625.jpg
SAV-5 Light tank 47 mm gun 1930-1940 First mass produced tank of Urcean design Vickers6ton front.JPG
SAV-6 Medium tank 55 mm gun 1937-1945 First medium tank mass produced by Urcea; remained in intermittent service in Audonia through 1953 German tanks of Panzerabteilung 40 advancing towards the frontline at Vasonvaara.jpg
SAV-6D Tank destroyer 75 mm gun 1937-1945 Built on the SAV-6 chassis StuGIII.jpg
SAV-7 Light tank 47 mm 1938-1946 Last light tank of Urcean design M5A1 Stuart 1942-1.jpg
SAV-8 Medium tank 55 mm gun 1939-1945 Panzer IV 1.jpg
SAV-9 Medium tank 75 mm gun 1942-1950 Considered by some historians to be an early main battle tank;
Replaced all other armored units in standard use in 1945
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-H26258, Panzer V "Panther".jpg
SAV-10 Main battle tank 75 mm gun 1948-1965 First main battle tank of Urcean design OF-40 MBT.jpg
SAV-11 Main battle tank 105 mm gun 1965-1994 Remains in foreign service Leopard1 Bundeswehr 1983.jpg
SAV-12 Main battle tank 105 mm gun 1989-present 3rd ABCT Soldiers practice weapons proficiency during gunnery 170119-A-XQ291-845.jpg

APCs and IFVs

Early tanks and infantry carriers were sometimes indistinguishable, but the SIAV-1, licensed from Burgundie was considered different enough from a tank to warrant the creation of the Standard Infantry Armored Vehicle designation within the Royal and Imperial Army's standardization system. Initially intended as a complete delivery system for combat operations - including infantry transport and artillery support - artillery was dropped from the SIAV line vehicles after the SIAV-1 as military thinking came closer to modern thought in regards to armored personnel carriers. The first SIAV with true military significance was the SIAV-4; the SIAV-1 and its immediate successors were mostly relegated to experimental operations outside of key theaters.

Tank name Type Armament Years in service Notes Picture
SIAV-1 Armored fighting vehicle 1x .324 Royal machine gun 1925-1929 Licensed from Burgundie StChamondLaat.jpg
SIAV-4 Armored personnel carrier
Half track
1x .324 Royal machine gun 1938-1960 OT-810 pic1.JPG

Other

Aircraft

Fighters

Aircraft name Branches Years in service Notes Picture
SAFM-1 Royal Army, Royal Air Fleet 1914-1918 RAF Vickers FB5 Gunbus.jpg
SAFM-2 Royal Army, Royal Air Fleet 1917-1923 RAF Sopwith Camel.jpg

Bombers

Attack aircraft

Naval scouts

Prior to the realization of the impact of air power on naval warfare at the Battle of the Adonáire Strait in 1935, Urcea employed a number of airplanes designed exclusively for scouting and spotting information for the Royal Navy's capital ships. The Canaery-class aircraft carrier was, consequently, designed to carry a large number of these small yet nimble scouting planes which had virtually no armament but carried photographic equipment. Following the battle, virtually all naval scout planes were retired and placed with purpose-built naval fighters and bombers. Some reconnaissance planes were also used in small numbers by the Royal and Imperial Army in the first years of the Great War, but their use was phased out by 1929. Of the three, the SASM-2 were built in the greatest numbers, and their larger size made them the only planes that could be jury-rigged for weapons during the Battle of the Adonáire Strait. The SASM-3 was the first monoplane in service in any branch of the Armed Forces of the Apostolic Kingdom of Urcea.

Aircraft name Branches Years in service Notes Picture
SASM-1 Royal Navy, Royal and Imperial Army 1927-1935 Hawker danecock.jpg
SASM-2 Royal Navy 1930-1935 DH 42.jpg
SASM-3 Royal Navy 1933-1935 Vickers 125 Vireo.jpg

Helicopters

Tilt-rotors

Airships

Ships and naval craft

Battleships

Ship class name Number constructed Years in commission Notes Picture
Julian-class battleship 2 1904-1930 One ship, the HMCMS Valcum, was sold to Burgundie for use as a
powership
German battleship SMS Lothringen underway at sea before 1914 (ggbain.28288).jpg
Archduchy-class battleship 6 1909-1953 One ship, the HMCMS Star of the Sea, was sold to Burgundie for use as a
prison hulk
SMS Rheinland NH 46835.jpg
Restoration-class battleship 2 1915-1937 The British Battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth; 35,00o Ton Battleship. A16385.jpg
Ardri-class battleship 13 1920-1953 USS Tennessee BB-43 underway.jpg
Leo the Great-class battleship 15 1934-1960 The Royal Navy during the Second World War A29859.jpg
Abylf Steppe-class battleship 4 1939-1967 Twelve ships were planned but most were canceled in favor of the Apostolic King-class. USS North Carolina NYNY 11306-6-46.jpg
Apostolic King-class battleship 18 1943-2019 Final battleship produced for the Royal Navy. BB61 USS Iowa BB61 broadside USN.jpg

Aircraft carriers

Ship class name Number constructed Years in commission Notes Picture
Canaery-class aircraft carrier 7 1927-1938 One ship, the HMCMS Arelate remained in service until 1947 as a training ship;
three carriers were transferred to the Navy of Burgundie
Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi 01.jpg
Victory-class aircraft carrier 2 1937-1961 The Victory class ships were both converted Restoration-class battleships USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) underway at sea on 23 January 1944 (80-G-212798).jpg
Gabban-class aircraft carrier 5 1937-1957 The Gabban class ships were all converted Apostle-class cruisers USS Saipan (CVL-48) at sea with helicopters embarked, circa in 1955 (NH 67747).jpg
Adjudicator-class aircraft carrier 37 2011-present F-A-18F Super Hornet approaches to USS Gerald R. Ford.jpg
Indefatigable-class aircraft carrier 17 2023-present Indefatigable.jpg

Cruisers

Ship class name Number constructed Years in commission Notes Picture
Coria-class cruiser 43 1908-1939 SMS Dresden 1909 LOC det 4a16116.jpg
Glens Falls-class cruiser 37 1912-1945 HMS Cambrian (1915).jpg
Apostle-class cruiser 21 1916-1953 HMS Vindictive cruiser.jpg

Destroyers

Destroyer Escorts

Destroyer escorts were a type of smaller ships which could achieve 20 knots and were primarily designed for anti-submarine warfare and convoy escort during the Great War. Their small size and relative simplicity of design allowed for them to be produced in large numbers.

Ship class name Number constructed Years in commission Notes Picture
Creagmer-class destroyer escort 198 1940-1964 Large numbers of these ships were transferred to allied nations during the Great War
and afterwards; only a handful remained in Urcean service past 1953
USS Cannon (DE-99) underway in Delaware Bay on 5 September 1943 (NH 83390).jpg

Frigates

Corvettes

Support ships

Other