Office of the Federal Army

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The office of the Federal Army is one of the six major Offices of Government in the Federal State of Kistan, and operates as the armed forces of the nation. It should be noted that, while called an 'army', it also includes the nation's naval, air, and strategic military assets due to the organizational structure of the Office. Due to its nature as a military force, its hierarchy is radically different to the civilian branches of the government. The Federal Army is the only one of the Six-Office System which responds primarily to the Office of the Despotate.

Office of the Federal Army
Roinn an Fyddin Feadaral
MottoUnified, we are Unbreakable
Founded19##
Service branchesNational Land Army
  • National Land Army Bureau
  • Army Sea Guard Bureau
  • Army Air Guard Bureau
  • Army Strategic Bureau
Websitewww.arm.gov.fh
Leadership
Chief Army OfficerDelyth Guair
Manpower
Military age19-45, 25-60 for off-field officers
Conscription19-21 year-olds are required to take a fundamentals course, but are not considered draftees or officially tallied.
Available for
military service
82,475,947, age 15–49
Fit for
military service
27,534,938, age 15–49
Active personnel859,124 (ranked 8th)
Reserve personnel5,117,866
Federal Army of Fhainnaeran
Fyddin Feadaral an Fhainn
Founded12 March 1906
Service branchesNational Land Army Bureau
Army Sea Guard Bureau
Army Air Guard Bureau
Army Strategic Bureau
HeadquartersMinistry of Defence, Oirthidun
Leadership
DespotBrennan Walaerin
Chief Army OfficerDelyth Guair
Manpower
Military age19-45
Conscription1 month
Active personnel859,124 (ranked 8th)
Reserve personnel5,117,866
Expenditures
Budget113,866,603,200 (Thaler)
Percent of GDP7.2% (2020)
Industry
Domestic suppliers
Related articles
Historyarticle
article
article
RanksRanks and Insignia of the Fhainnin Army

GDP: 9,884,253,539,749.65 16% overall tax rate 1,581,480,600,000 usd taxes 7.2% military spending

Office of the Federal Army

History

Pre-national Forces

The typical Fhainin soldier for the first few thousand years of recorded history (known as a Ceiternin) was armed with a sword (deamhbah), javelins (gah), and various daggers. They generally favored no armor or padded cloth, as tribal tactics focused on skirmishes and ambush over pitched fighting. These troops were organized into rough units collectively referred to as Ceiternn, or warbands, which numbered anywhere from thirty to four hundred men depending on the size of the populations from which they were raised. The leader of each warband was either elected or lead by charisma and was referred to as a Ceiternna, and responded directly to the commanding noble or official, assuming they themselves were not operating autonomously. Many local bands fought against invading forces both foreign and native without a call to arms, often boiling the distinction between soldiery and highwaymen down to a matter of loyalties.

The constant combative nature of the area made proper settlement and annexation by anything other than dedicated armies incredibly difficult, as while early Holy Levantine forces and opportunistic raiders had free reign of the land when organized, attempts to remove or subjugate the native populations of the Ninerivers typically resulted in settlements being sacked at any opportunity.

As Christianity took hold within the country from those foreign settlements which had been established peaceably or lasted in small holds along the coastline, local nobility began to employ professional soldiers in addition to militias. These Ardceiterninn continued to use javelins and swords, but additionally took up shortbows along with rounded wooden shields and metal armor (most commonly mail coats or lamellar designs copied from Latin and Coscivian designs). Most also trained to fight on horseback as their Ceiterninn auxiliaries did, largely replacing the mounted skirmishers and relegating peasant troops to foot combat by the tenth century. While not approaching the social prestige or full plate of Latin knights, these soldiers typically fought with similar discipline and pride, earning a reputation as competent bodyguards and cavalry mercenaries throughout Levantia.

Rethysian Army System

The first Kings of the Fhainn fought with essentially the same troops as their ancestors and opponents had for innumerable generations before, and did so successfully. However, the inherent disorganization and decentralization of feudal forces made mobilizing to fight large wars increasingly difficult, and by the fourteenth century, firearms and cannons made organized formations increasingly important.

In response to this need for a large army loyal directly to the Throne, King (Rih) Bronlan Màrtainn reorganized his personal army into more standardized units of four hundred men, arming them with weapons produced in batches and mixing soldiers from various locales and former polities to head off unit-wide insurrection from the largely independent Vicars ruling in his name. This idea was originally attributed to his father, Rethys Màrtainn, but in modern times this is thought to be an apocryphal tale spread by Bronlan himself to deflect criticism as he did with many of his reforms.

Aside from introducing a degree of standardization, Bronlan created a larger officer system, with Captains (almost invariably minor nobles) replacing Ceiternnas and introducing Sergeant-Generals to lead units of two thousand men, themselves responding a General leading as many troops as were appointed to his command. While still inefficient and lacking in long campaigning ability and contemporary command and control, this system at least allowed for a functional army to be fielded against other states with relative coordination and modern equipment (and, more importantly, without cajoling the Vicars to field soldiers on the behalf of the King).

The Rethysian System formally separated Fhainnin soldiers into distinct infantry and cavalry types, with the Ardceirerninn being transformed into more traditional lancer cavalry, while the levy troops were given arquebuses to replace their earlier ranged weapons. Swords were kept by both branches, with confiscation of the weapons being unrealistic given the proliferation of weapons within the budding country. Foot Ardceirerninn and the few remaining cavalry Ceirerninn specialized as longbowmen and skirmish cavalry respectively, with the former fading into obscurity and the latter taking up varying roles as early dragoons or reconnaissance units for the main armies. Static cannon were also introduced and attached as needed to the infantry for support in sieges.

Combined Royal Army

- army reorganized into conscription system with nobles as officers - later, nobles lose rights due to a coup by the monarch solidifying central power

Great War Era

- republican army organized along more foreign lines,

Post-War Era

Strategic Aims

Political Involvement


Army Land Bureau


Organization

Standard Unit Types:

Infantry: Light, Motorized/Mechanized, Garrison

Armor: Light, Normal

Artillery: Light, Field, Self-Propelled, Anti-Air Field, Anti-Air Self Propelled, Field Rocket, Self-Propelled Rocket, Self Propelled Missile, Anti-Tank Field, Anti-Tank Self-Propelled

Support: Hospital, Logistics/Quartermaster, Signal, Headquarters, Engineering, Ordinance, Recon (Cavalry, Motorized Cavalry, Air Cavalry)

Generally speaking, a Rhon will be marked as Infantry, Armor, or Support, with Infantry and Armor Rhonn containing their own support Bragadts, Catalionn, and Cuartoris; a Support Rhon is composed of several identical noncombat Bragadts with additional support units under a more robust command staff to support local Chorp operations as required. In some cases, additional combat support formations (i.e. Recon or Ordinance) may be attached temporarily to a Rhon or even to a Bragadt within a Rhon - for example, an ad-hoc formation created to counter an armored advance may be assigned an entire anti-tank Catalion per frontline Bragadt in addition to or instead of the one assigned under direct Rhon command, tripling or quadrupling the usual anti-tank armament of the formation as a whole (assuming full staff and supply).


Medical, Signals, and other support formations typically are grouped into Cuartori or at most Bragadt, but normally these personnel are distributed throughout the larger formations they serve with to fulfil their roles directly. Proper formations of these may be grouped into information centers, field or proper hospital units, etc.

Unit types:

HQ (HQ): covers command and bureaucratic units.

Infantry (X): variants include light infantry, mot/mech infantry (x with box), mountain (x, filled bottom), air drop (x, filled top), and marine units (anchor).

Recon (/): variants include horse recon (slash), wheeled (slash, boc, and bottom dots) and tracked recon (slash, block, and bottom line)

Armor (box): variants include light armor (box) and line armor (box with vertical middle line), plus miscellaneous armored wheeled (box with bottom dots) or tracked (box with bottom line) units

Artillery (dot): variants include field guns (dot), self-propelled artillery (dot with box), mortars (x with top tot), and aa guns (self-propelled - dot, box, up-chevron -, static - dot, up chevron -, and missile - up chevron, up triangle)

field (box with and self-propelled missile or rocket (box with down chevron and middle dot)

field missile

sp-missile (

Engineering (E): covers units handling ordinance and bomb disposal, general combat engineering, and construction planning.

Quartermaster (Q): covers supply and logistics bureaucratic units.

Military Police (MP: covers policing and courts units.

Labor and Supply (shovel): covers construction and supply line units.

Maintenance (wrench): covers equipment management units

Hospital (+): covers combat medical personnel, field and rear hospitals, mortuary units, and specialist units such as dental, radiological, etc.

Signals (connection symbol): covers military intelligence, electronic warfare, radio and other communications methods, counterintelligence and other units.

Field Service Military Units
Unit Symbol Formation Roles Formation Sizes
Infantry (Light) frontline combat, frequently garrison duties
Infantry (Motorized) frontline combat
Infantry (Mechanized) frontline combat
Infantry (Air Drop) frontline combat, paradrop landing
Infantry (Mountain) frontline combat, rough terrain fighting
Infantry (Marine) frontline combat, shore landing
Infantry (Mortar) frontline combat, light artillery support
Artillery (Surface-to-Surface, Field) combat support, infantry support
Artillery (Surface-to-Surface, Self-Propelled) combat support, mobile infantry support
Artillery (Surface-to-Surface, Field, Missile/Rocket) combat support, static specialist artillery
Artillery (Surface-to-Surface, Self-Propelled, Missile) combat support, specialist artillery
Artillery (Anti-Air, Field) combat support, conventional antiair
Artillery (Anti-Air, Self-Propelled) combat support, mobile anti-air
Artillery (Anti-Air, Field, Missile) combat support, static antiair
Artillery (Anti-Air, Self-Propelled, Missile) combat support, specialist antiair
Artillery (Anti-Armor, Field) combat support, antitank defense
Artillery (Anti-Armor, Self-Propelled) combat support, tank hunting
Artillery (Anti-Armor) combat support
Recon (Horse) intel and maneuver
Recon (Car/Motorcycle) intel and maneuver
Recon (Tracked) intel and maneuver
Recon (Air) intel and light air support
Armored (Car) combat support, infantry support
Armored (Tracked) frontline combat and maneuver, infantry support
Armored (Light) frontline combat and maneuver
Armored (Line) frontline combat, anti-armor,
Air (Anti-Air) air intercept
Air (General Purpose) air intercept, ground support
Air (Tactical Support) tactical bombing
Air (Heavy Support) strategic bombing or transport
Engineer
Labor and Supply
Signals
Military Police
Quartermaster
Medical
Headquarters


Standard Chorp: Composed of one Headquarters Cuartori, three combat Rhon, and one support Rhon. Other units are usually attached at this organizational level for specialized tasks.

Standard Combat Rhon:

Standard Support Rhon:

Air Service Catalionn: Composed of a Pilot/Technical Cuartori and a logistical Cuartori; 400 men in total typically operating anywhere from 4-40 aircraft depending on type.

Air Supply Bragadt: Composed of one Headquarters Cuartori, one medical Cuartori and a logistics Catalion; 1000 men in total commanding and supporting 2-6 Air Service units.

Army Marine Rhon:

Army Air Drop Rhon:


===Standing Units===

Army Central Command:

Basic Training Rhon:

Specialist Training Rhon:

Reserve Coordination Bragadt:

1. Army: Composed of one Headquarters Cuartori and five standardized Chorps, all of which are mechanized/motorized with tank elements. Attached are two of the Army Special Services' four Catalionn, five Air Supply Bragadts, and eighteen Air Service Catalionn.

2. Army: Composed of one Headquarters Cuartori and five standardized Chorps, one of which is mechanized with tank elements and four of which are motorized. Attached is one of the Army Special Services' four Catalionn, four Air Supply Bragadts, and fifteen Air Service Catalionn.

3. Army: Composed of one Headquarters Cuartori and three standardized Chorps, two of which are motorized and one which is not properly motorized.

Army Special Service HQ and 1st Catalion

Army Marine Rhon:

Army Air Drop Rhon:

Army Garrison/Reserve Coordination Bragadts: Composed of one Headquarters Cuartori and eighteen Bragadts, each including one Headquarters Cuartori, one nonstandard infantry Catalion (which may have anti-aircraft, anti-tank, or other assets depending on placement on a military base or in a city), and one logistical Catalion.

Doctrine and Training

Equipment and Assets

Personnel/Vehicles Numbers
Main Army Troops
Marine Troops
Airborne Troops
Naval Forces
Air Force
Main battle tanks
Light tanks
Infantry fighting vehicles
Armoured personnel carriers
Self-propelled Artillery

Rank Structure

Land Force LOTA Equivalent CO's Rank Attendant's Rank Average Full Staff Unit Composed Of Abbreviation and Standardized Designation
Army Army (XXXX) General Lft. General varies greatly various Chorps and attached units
Chorp Corps (XXX) Chorporra CHR Lft. up to 43,800 prior to attached units 2-5 Rhonn (typically 3 combat, 1 noncombat) and attached units 1. CHR
Rhon Division (XX) Rhonorra RHN Lft. up to 8750 prior to attached units 2-3 Bradagts and attached units 1.1 RHN
Bragadt Brigade (X) Bragorra BGT Lft. up to 2900 2-3 Catalionn 1.1.1 BGT
Catalion Battalion (III) Ardcaptaen CAT Lft. up to 950 2-3 Ceiternn 1st CAT
Ceitern Regiment (II) Captaen CTN Serdeant up to 300 2-6 Tastels 1st CTN
Tastel Company (I) Serdeant TSL Serdeant up to 50 5 Sgibos 1st Tastel
Sgibo Squad () Sgiobair 10 1st Sgibo
Cith (Eng. Friends/fireteam) Sgiobair-Leift. 4-6 ad-hoc personnel groupings

All COs are technically considered officers in the Fhainnin rank structure, and non-officers are referred to as Men-at-Arms. Any soldier can theoretically attain the rank of Captaen, though this typically is reserved for officer training school candidates and higher ranks require such training as a prerequisite. Appointments to the ranks of Lft. General and higher almost always require appropriate political leanings and specialized schooling in addition to the demonstrated competence and leadership qualities expected of the upper echelons.

Army Sea Bureau


Going into the second quarter of the century, the composition of the Army naval service is changing as older, larger warships become slightly less prominent compared to a larger force of smaller surface combatants. While the light support carrier doctrine employed by the Army remains a key point in Fhainnin strategy within the ______ Sea and in its littoral waters along the open ocean, budget cuts and the lack of a serious neighboring rival make lobbying for a larger navy a weak political position. Currently, the Army plans to phase out much of its older surface fleet in favor of modern designs. While the total number of heavy surface combatants will drop, a larger array of small vessels is planned. Forays into missile boats in particular are in vogue for white-water operations, though the overall trend in modern naval design is a greater integration of air assets with naval ones, as evidenced by the fact that the vast majority of new designs take landing pads into account compared to older Fhainic designs, many of which lagged behind in this area.

Organization

Inner Sea Fleet

First Squadron:

Second Squadron:

Third Squadron:

Fourth Squadron:

Fifth Squadron:

Outer Sea Fleet

First Squadron:

Second Squadron:

Third Squadron:

Ship Class/Role Designations

Doctrine and Training

Equipment and Assets

Also: 18 submarines, 43 very light boats (<1k tons), and 3 small icebreakers List of Mothballed Ships

Ship Name Class Roles Designation Displacement Air Compliment Completed Est. Crew Squadron Notes
DD1921-33 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support War Memorial 1927
DD1943-14 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Museum Ship 1945
DD1943-17 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Museum Ship 1946
DD1950-2 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1957
DD1950-3 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1957
DD1950-4 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1958
DL1961-3 Torpedo Destroyer Torpedo Ship Obsolete (Mothballed) 1963
DL1961-4 Torpedo Destroyer Torpedo Ship Obsolete (Mothballed) 1965
DL1961-7 Torpedo Destroyer Torpedo Ship Obsolete (Mothballed) 1968
Hospital Ship CH1984-1 'Putrainn' Cruiser Noncombat Support Obsolete (Mothballed)
Hospital Ship CH1984-2 'Amenable' Cruiser Noncombat Support Obsolete (Mothballed)
CR1965-1 'Haelcoucar' Cruiser Research Ship Obsolete (Mothballed) 1 Helicopter or VTOL Deep Sea Research Vessel.
CC1955-17 'Saint's Fire' Cruiser Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1964
CC1963-1 'Fortuity' Cruiser Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1967
CC1963-3 'Republican Pride' Cruiser Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1968
CL1958-4 'Tricutia' Cruiser Shore Operations Obsolete (Mothballed) 1960
BCM1966-1 'Cananach II' Battlecruiser Fire Support Obsolete (Mothballed) 1972
CC1955-12 'Safvos' Cruiser Fire Support Museum Ship 1962
CVL1949-5 'Triple Threat' Light Carrier Air Power Projection Museum Ship STOBAR configuration, 25 fixed wing craft, 2 Helicopters or VTOLs 1955 Refits later added Helicopter/VTOL pads.

List of Ships (Individual, Active)

Ship Name Class Roles Designation Displacement Air Compliment Completed Est. Crew Squadron Notes
DL1961-6 Torpedo Destroyer Torpedo Ship Obsolete 1435 tons 1965
DL1970-1 Frigate Research Ship Outdated 1365 tons 1978 Science and electronic systems testing ship.
DLM1997-1 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1997
DLM1997-2 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1998
DLM1997-3 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1998
DLM1997-4 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1999
DLM1997-5 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1999
DLM1997-6 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1999
DLM1997-7 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1999
DLM1997-8 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 1999
DLM1997-9 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 2000
DLM1997-10 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 2000
DLM1997-11 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 2000
DLM1997-12 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 2000
DLM1997-13 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 2000
DLM1997-14 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1315 tons 2001
DLM2013-1 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1360 tons 2018
DLM2013-2 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1360 tons 2018
DLM2013-3 Frigate Screening, Escort Modern 1360 tons 2019
DE1981-1 Destroyer Minelaying Outdated 1635 tons 1983
DE1981-2 Destroyer Minelaying Outdated 1635 tons 1983
DE2001-1 Destroyer Minelaying Modern 1530 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2010
DD1978-6 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1979
DD1978-7 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1979
DD1978-8 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1980
DD1978-9 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1980
DD1978-10 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1980
DD1978-11 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1980
DD1978-13 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1983
DD1978-14 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support Outdated 2135 tons 1984
DDM1995-1 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 2000
DDM1995-2 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 2003
DDM1995-3 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 2004
DDM1995-4 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 2005
DDM2002-1 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2005
DDM2002-2 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2007
DDM2002-3 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2008
DDM2002-4 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3435 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2008
DDM2015-1 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2017
DDM2015-2 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2018
DDM2015-3 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2018
DDM2015-4 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2018
DDM2015-5 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support Modern 3730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2019
CR2003-1 'Coscach' Cruiser Research Ship Modern 4375 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Deep Sea Research Vessel.
CR2003-2 'Catus' Cruiser Research Ship Modern 4375 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Environmental Studies Vessel
CM1967-1 'Scrimp' Cruiser Fire Support Obsolete 9310 tons n/a 1971 Completed late due to manufacturing errors.
CM1967-2 'Kurikila II' Cruiser Fire Support Obsolete 9310 tons n/a 1970
CM1967-3 'Constantoc' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9310 tons 1982
CM1967-4 'Cyriath' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9310 tons 1983
CM1967-5 'Gualla-Ruad' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9310 tons 1983
CM1967-7 'Dúnlaff' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9310 tons 1986 Sunk in shallow waters and re-floated in 1992-95.
CM1967-8 'Teindun' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9310 tons 1989
CM1967-9 'Umadun' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9310 tons 1989
CM1988-1 'Occidun' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9380 tons 1990
CM1988-2 'Oridun' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9380 tons 1990
CM1988-3 'Oirthidun' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9380 tons 1990
CM1988-4 'June Fifth' Cruiser Fire Support Outdated 9340 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 1994 Refit added a helipad in 2003 prior to the Type CM2004.
CM2002-1 'Mhartainn' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 6695 tons 2007 Completed late after design overtaken by CM2004-class.
CM2002-2 'Velikaya Voyna' ('Great War') Cruiser Fire Support Modern 6695 tons 2009 Completed late after design overtaken by CM2004-class.
CM2004-1 'Gorod Doliny' ('City of the Vale') Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2009 Proof-of-concept ship for helicopter pads on smaller vessels.
CM2004-2 'Felin Dun' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2010
CM2004-3 'Gwilyr Dun' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2013
CM2004-4 'Sergalthen Dun' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2013
CM2004-5 'Veselovsky' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2015
CM2004-6 'Rybakov' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2015
CM2004-7 'Kulik' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 8990 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2016
CM2016-1 'Meadarloch' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2018
CM2016-2 'Calltainn' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2019
CM2016-3 'Turlann' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2018
CM2016-4 'Ghaidhealaibh' Cruiser Fire Support Modern 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2019
CL1986-1 'Consequence' Cruiser Shore Operations Outdated 11,425 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 1991
CL1986-2 'Undercut' Cruiser Shore Operations Outdated 11,425 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 1991
CL2002-1 'Luster' Cruiser Shore Operations Modern 12,330 tons 2 Helicopters or VTOLs 2003
CL2002-2 'Errant' Cruiser Shore Operations Modern 12,330 tons 2 Helicopters or VTOLs 2003
CL2002-3 'Valiant' Cruiser Shore Operations Modern 12,330 tons 2 Helicopters or VTOLs 2005
CL2012-1 'Uppercut' Cruiser Shore Operations Modern 11,605 tons 3 Helicopters or VTOLs 2015
Hospital Ship CH1984-3 'Jude's Grace' Cruiser Noncombat Support Outdated 12,355 tons 3 Helicopters or VTOLs 1993 Refitted for continued service.
Icebreaker CI-34 'Bess' Cruiser Noncombat Support Outdated 17,805 tons 1971
Icebreaker CI-14 'Redundant' Cruiser Noncombat Support Outdated 17,805 tons 1981
Icebreaker CI-36 'Sea Cow' Cruiser Noncombat Support Outdated 17,895 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 1992
Icebreaker CI-17 'Landeshknekt' Cruiser Noncombat Support Modern 19,590 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2003
Icebreaker CI-12 'Archipelago' Cruiser Noncombat Support Modern 25,430 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2011
CVLM1949-7 'White Stripe' Light Carrier Air Power Projection Obsolete 43,150 tons STOBAR configuration, 25 light fixed wing craft, 2 Helicopters or VTOLs 1967 Refits later added Helicopter/VTOL pads and missiles. Built considerably later than others in class to restart air power program.
CVLN1980-1 'Green Stripe' Light Carrier Research Ship Outdated 48,650 tons CATOBAR configuration, 25 fixed wing craft, 3 Helicopters or VTOLs 1983 Proof-of-Concept for CATOBAR and nuclear carrier programs.
CVLM1988-1 'Thundershrike' Light Helicopter Carrier Air Power Projection Modern 21,470 tons 8 Helicopters or VTOLs 1992
CVLM1999-1 'Haynead' Light Carrier Air Power Projection Modern 48,230 tons STOBAR configuration, 28 fixed wing craft, 4 Helicopters or VTOLs 2001
CVNM2004-1 'Rhigeralt' Carrier Air Power Projection Modern 58,930 tons STOBAR configuration, 34 fixed wing craft, 10 Helicopters or VTOLs 2016 Completed late for political reasons and design issues. Refits reduced carrying capacity.
CVLNM2004-1 'Red Stripe' Light Carrier Air Power Projection Modern 48,810 tons STOBAR configuration, 28 fixed wing craft, 12 Helicopters or VTOLs 2009
BCNM1990-1 'Lann Aengle III' Battlecruiser Fire Support Outdated 22,090 tons n/a 1998
BCNM2000-1 'Aengland' Battlecruiser Fire Support Modern 22,680 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2009
BCNM2000-2 'Lann Slawe IV' Battlecruiser Fire Support Modern 22,680 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2011
BCNM2000-3 'Lann Fhainnin II' Battlecruiser Fire Support, Flagship Modern 22,680 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2012

List of Ships (Individual, Planned/In Construction)

Potential Name Class Roles Displacement Air Compliment Hull Status
DE2010-1 Destroyer Minelaying 1650 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DE2010-2 Destroyer Minelaying 1650 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DLM2013-4 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons Hull Laid
DLM2013-5 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons Hull Laid
DLM2013-6 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons Hull Laid
DLM2013-7 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons Hull Laid
DLM2013-8 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons Hull Laid
DLM2013-9 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons 2022 (Construction begins 2020)
DLM2013-10 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons 2022 (Construction begins 2021)
DLM2013-11 Frigate Screening, Escort 1360 tons 2022 (Construction begins 2022)
DLM2020-1 Frigate Screening, Escort 1205 tons 2025 (Construction begins 2024)
DDM2015-6 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support 1730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DDM2015-7 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support 1730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DDM2015-8 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support 1730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DDM2015-9 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support 1730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DDM2015-10 Destroyer Escort, ASW, Fire Support 1730 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
DDM2019-1 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support 1815 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2025 (Construction begins 2023)
DDM2019-2 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support 1815 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2025 (Construction begins 2023)
DDM2019-3 Destroyer Escort, Fire Support 1815 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2026 (Construction begins 2025)
CM2016-5 'Beinn Mult' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
CM2016-6 'Shaerhal' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
CM2016-7 'Beacan' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL Hull Laid
CM2016-8 'Cuimridh' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2022 (Construction begins 2020)
CM2016-9 'Pheofhair' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2022 (Construction begins 2020)
CM2016-10 'New Anglia II' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2024 (Construction begins 2020)
CM2016-11 'Opekun Vraelki' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2025 (Construction begins 2021)
CM2016-12 'Opekun Lyukqui V' Cruiser Fire Support 9255 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2025 (Construction begins 2021)
BCNM-2019-1 'Lann Fedarail' Battlecruiser Fire Support 24,540 tons 1 Helicopter or VTOL 2027 (Construction begins 2021)
CVLNM2015-1 'Monarkh Morya' ('Sea Monarch') Light Carrier Air Power Projection 47,760 tons STOBAR configuration, 20 fixed wing aircraft, 4 Helicopters or VTOLs Hull Laid
CVLNM2015-2 'Obraztsovyy Glavnyy' ('Model Major') Light Carrier Air Power Projection 47,760 tons STOBAR configuration, 20 fixed wing aircraft, 4 Helicopters or VTOLs Hull Laid
Hospital Ship CH2017-1 'Angel's Wings' Cruiser Noncombat Support 28,810 tons 3 Helicopters or VTOLs Hull Laid

List of Ships (Collective)

Ship Class Designation Classification Role Active Nearing Service End Future Planned Projected Future Active Vessels Notes
DD Conventional Destroyer 8 8 0 0
DE Mine Warfare Ship 3 2 2 3
DL Light Torpedo/Test Ship 2 (1*) 2 0 0
DLM Missile Boat 17 0 9 26
DDM Missile Destroyer 13 0 8 21 need 8 more
CR* Science Ship 2* 0 0 2 need 1 more
CI* Heavy Icebreaker 5* 3** 0* 5*
CH* Hospital Ship 1* 1** 1* 2*
CL Landing Support Ship 6 2 0 4 need 1 more
CM Missile Cruiser 25 12 8 21
CVLM Support Carrier 3 1 2 4
CVLN* Nuclear Light Carrier 1* 1* 0* 0
CVNM Nuclear Fleet Carrier 2 0 0 2
BCNM Battlecruiser 4 1 1 4
Light Combat Vessels 48 13 19 (gonna be 28) 56
Heavy Combat Vessels (CM and greater) 34 14 11 31
Non-Combat Vessels 10 6 1 (gonna be 2) 9**
Total 92 33 31 (gonna be 42) 96

Rank Structure


Army Air Bureau


Organization

Doctrine and Training

Equipment and Assets

Rank Structure


Army Strategic Bureau


Organization

Equipment and Assets

Major Divisions


Army Logistics Bureau


Organization

Equipment and Assets

Major Divisions


misc.

Naming Conventions for small arms, weapons systems, and ships

SS, CV, CVA, BB, BC, CA, CC, CL, DD, CL, DL, TP, N- (nuclear-powered), M- (missile), C- (conventional)

Additional Ranks - Chaplain, Corps-General, Brigade-General, Division-General, Amry-General, Knight- award prefix, Citizen Militant (conscript)

APC, IFV, MOT, MCH, L-ARM, ARM, H-ARM, AT, SP-AT, AA, SP-AA, R-ART, ART, H-ART, L-ART, SP-ART, SPR-ART, etcetera

CIWS, SAMS (surface-air missile), SSMS, AAMS, IMGS (machine gun)

Common system designation example - L-ART Type 2017/1 = mortar, designed 2017, first variant designed in category that year

example 2 - NM-BC 2001-1 #2 - nuclear-powered, missile-equipped heavy cruiser/battlecruiser designed 2001, second of class

859,124 active, 5,117,866 reserve, 36,881 paramilitary = 6,013,871 total

38.4% of pop in eligible age range, 12.82% of total pop in age range and within service parameters

Gantsgun Heavy Engineering

Ladvner Technical Solutions

Hydrus Arms

Spetsford Shipyards United

Seaplane Carriers

Carrier Conversions

Airships

Submarines

Submarine Carriers