International Racing Federation

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International Racing Federation
Abbreviation IRF
Type Sports federation for auto racing
Legal status Voluntary association
Purpose/focus Motorists' issues
Motorsports
Membership 39 national organizations
President Johann Mort
Affiliations
  • Grand Prix Racing Series
  • Stock Racing Series
  • Moto Racing Series

The International Racing Federation (IRF) is a voluntary association that governs both the operation of numerous racing series globally as well as representing the interests of motorists, vehicle manufacturers, and road safety around the globe; though it is much better known publicly for its activities as the former. As an international organization, the IRF maintains offices in 39 countries around the world with a rotating headquarters.

The IRF is best known for the Grand Prix Racing series and Stock Racing series which it administrates, licenses, and arbitrates. In addition to its oversight of racing and advocacy for numerous issues, the IRF also has international administration over the certification of land speed record attempts. The IRF has recognition as a sporting association from a majority of other international sporting associations.

History[edit | edit source]

The International Racing Federation (IRF) was founded at the beginning of the 20th century explicitly to govern international automobile races. The beginning of automobile racing ultimately began with the invention of the automobile as even the earliest models of motor vehicles competed for top speeds. Professional motorsports briefly preceded the advent of commercial vehicles and competitions quickly expanded beyond national borders necessitating standardization or at the very least oversight. The IRF would fulfil this role, though it remains and has always been a voluntary federation and no national or international laws mandate the oversight or rulings of the IRF in any particular competition.

The IRF's first role in motorsports was simply to assure the safety of both tracks and vehicles involved in races. It wasn't until the 1920s when the IRF also began to regulate prizes and wins through the control of prize money and the standardization of point attribution for every race. In the early days of motorsports when there were few if any distinctions between stock cars and open-wheeled racecars the IRF counted points from all categories toward a single World Drivers Championship even if the races were in different categories including rally racing, hillclimbing, endurance racing, oval racing, and grand prix circuit racing . In this era, a driver who would compete in every single IRF-governed event would be the exception and events could even coincide. It wouldn't be until 1950 that the IRF would separate categories between stock racing, grand prix racing, and endurance racing each with separate championships, standardized regulations for the series rather than per-race, and set calendars.

In 1999, the IRF acquired and merged the International Motorcycle Racing Federation (IMRF) into its existing organization and began administering the Moto Racing series as the IMRF had since 1949. All existing records and standards in the 50 years before the IRF's acquisition have been maintained by the newer administration.

Grand Prix Racing[edit | edit source]

Grand Prix Racing
GPR Logo.png
Category Single seater
Country International
Inaugural season 1950
Drivers 14
Constructors 7
Drivers' champion Jacob Asana
Constructors' champion Corse Hermès S.A.
Official website www.GrandPrixRacing.ix
Motorsport current event.svg Current season

Grand Prix Racing is the name given to the open-wheeled category of races governed by the IRF. First held in 1950, the Grand Prix Series is the oldest continuous racing series. Held annually from March to November, the calendar tours the globe over sixteen events. Races are held on a variety of circuits with varying conditions. This creates diverse experiences and challenges for drivers and fans each race weekend for the duration of each series. One of the fastest series in the world, the open-wheeled cars may be outdone in a straight line by other vehicles, but carry immense speed into corners and can lap a circuit faster than any other. Cars in Grand Prix Racing may reach speeds as fast as 380 km/h (236 mi/h). The series is the highest level of open-wheeled racing and is considered one of the most prestigious sports around the world. With a global audience, thousands of fans attend events in person while others watch television feeds translated into approximately a dozen languages. The cumulative live viewership of the 2030 season surpassed 60 billion.

Current Entries[edit | edit source]

Constructor Chassis Power unit Livery Drivers
No. Driver name Rounds
Monteangelo Anghel Octan Racing AC29 deBedecq V6H 37 AC29 6.png 6 Monteangelo Carla Helvet All
AC29 20.png 20 Monteangelo Gion Hilaire All
Corumm Conglomo Grand Prix Team XS1-01 Amazon M09 EQ Power+ XS1-01 28.png 28 Corumm Terboven Guo 7-13
XS1-01 52.png 52 Corumm Kim Shengkun 7-13
Insui Corse Hermès S.A. SF70H Hermès 062 EVO SF70H 1.png 1 Insui Jacob Asana All
SF70H 21.png 21 Insui Alequé Silva All
Pukhgundi Flag.png Force Pukhgundi Works VJM14 Amazon M09 EQ Power+ VJM14 11.png 11 Mutsutori Flag.png Odashi Kimi All
VJM14 60.png 60 Floredeterra Flag.png Timo Basuda All
Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing IC27 Hermès 062 EVO IC27 33.png 33 Heku Maxim Verstellus All
IC27 91.png 91 Pauldustllah Daniel Richards All
Cronzcovina Nerivas Nitro Racing NN-001 Amazon M09 EQ Power+ NN-001 66.png 66 Cronzcovina Alte Diatise 12 and 13
NN-001 26.png 26 Cronzcovina Saul Fleto 12 and 13
Burgundie O'Shea HIS Motorsports CT-22 Amazon M09 EQ Power+ CT-22 18.png 18 Burgundie Armand Cristophe All
CT-22 32.png 32 Burgundie Henri Meusart All
Heku Quicksilver Racing W09-EQ Amazon M09 EQ Power+ W09-EQ 44.png 44 Kiravia Bo Gelema All
W09-EQ 78.png 78 Urcea James Sawders All
Burgundie Racing Grand Premi deBedecq dB50-37 deBedecq V6H 37 DB50-37 5.png 5 Burgundie Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix All
DB50-37 8.png 8 Burgundie Brigida Alba All
Kistan Target Motorsports TM01 Hermès 062 EVO TM01 9.png 9 Kistan Lucian Walsh 5-13
TM01 39.png 39 Kistan Bronn Helde 5-13

Current Standings[edit | edit source]

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th 
Points 20 15 12 10 8 6 4 3 2 1
Pos. Driver Constructor INS
Insui
PAL
Palmeria
MON
Monteangelo
REC
Recep
LEV
Burgundie
KAZ
Kazirstan flag highres.png
XIN
Xingkai'pei Flag.png
PUK
Pukhgundi Flag.png
SHA
Shanjin Flag.png
ROS
Roseney Independence Flag.svg
RHO
United Kingdom of Helvianir and Rhodennir
COS
Cronzcovina Flag.jpg
CHA
Pauldustllah
SPE
Kistan
KIR
Kiravia
COR
Corumm
CAP
Heku
Points
1 Insui Alequé Silva Insui Corse Hermès S.A. 4 Ret 10 1 2 1 1 4 6 3 Ret 1 1 154
3 Monteangelo Carla Helvet Monteangelo Anghel Octan Racing 2 5 1 6 1 5 6 1 4 2 Ret 2 10 144
2 Insui Jacob Asana Insui Corse Hermès S.A. 1 4 3 5 5 2 8 5 2 1 Ret 9 2 136
4 Monteangelo Gion Hilaire Monteangelo Anghel Octan Racing 5 7 2 3 12 11 5 2 3 Ret 3 6 5 100
5 Heku Maxim Verstellus Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing Ret 3 5 4 8 3 7 6 7 Ret 1 3 9 93
6 Pauldustllah Daniel Richards Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing 7 2 7 2 14 9 4 Ret 8 4 2 7 4 92
7 Burgundie Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq Burgundie Racing Grand Premi deBedecq 6 1 Ret 9 3 4 2 13 5 Ret 11 8 14 76
8 Burgundie Brigida Alba Burgundie Racing Grand Premi deBedecq Ret Ret 4 7 6 6 14 Ret 1 5 4 10 Ret 65
9 Kistan Bronn Helde Kistan Target Motorsports 7 7 3 8 9 9 7 14 8 34
10 Floredeterra Flag.png Timo Basuda Pukhgundi Flag.png Force Pukhgundi Works 3 6 Ret Ret 13 8 16 10 15 12 14 11 6 28
11 Burgundie Armand Cristophe Burgundie O'Shea HIS Motorsports Ret 8 Ret Ret 4 Ret Ret Ret 11 6 6 Ret Ret 25
12 Kistan Lucian Walsh Kistan Target Motorsports 11 13 13 3 12 10 Ret 4 11 23
13 Urcea James Sawders Heku Quicksilver Racing 8 10 9 10 15 14 9 Ret 17 Ret 12 12 3 21
14 Burgundie Henri Meusart Burgundie O'Shea HIS Motorsports 9 9 Ret 8 10 10 15 11 13 Ret 10 5 13 15
15 Kiravia Bo Gelema Heku Quicksilver Racing Ret 12 8 Ret 9 12 10 12 Ret 13 5 15 Ret 14
16 Mutsutori Flag.png Odashi Kimi Pukhgundi Flag.png Force Pukhgundi Works Ret 11 6 11 16 15 17 Ret 16 11 9 Ret 7 12
17 Corumm Terboven Guo Corumm Conglomo Grand Prix Team 12 7 10 7 13 Ret Ret 9
18 Corumm Kim Shengkun Corumm Conglomo Grand Prix Team 11 9 14 8 8 13 15 8
19 Cronzcovina Saul Fleto Cronzcovina Nerivas Nitro Racing 16 Ret 0
20 Cronzcovina Alte Diatise Cronzcovina Nerivas Nitro Racing Ret 12 0
Pos. Driver Constructor INS
Insui
PAL
Palmeria
MON
Monteangelo
REC
Recep
LEV
Burgundie
KAZ
Kazirstan flag highres.png
XIN
Xingkai'pei Flag.png
PUK
Pukhgundi Flag.png
SHA
Shanjin Flag.png
ROS
Roseney Independence Flag.svg
RHO
United Kingdom of Helvianir and Rhodennir
COS
Cronzcovina Flag.jpg
CHA
Pauldustllah
SPE
Kistan
KIR
Kiravia
COR
Corumm
CAP
Heku
Points

Specifications[edit | edit source]

2031 Technical Specifications[edit | edit source]

Engine (majors) 2-litre V6 turbocharged engine and two Energy Recovery Systems (ERS) with ~800 hp.

  • Exhaust: Single exhaust with central exit
  • Intake: Variable length intake system

Chassis

  • Fuel capacity: 150 L according to IRF Grand Prix Racing regulations, 100 kg of fuel is equivalent to 130–140 L per race
  • Gearbox: 8-speed, fixed ratio
  • Front downforce wing: Maximum width of wing increased from 1,700 mm to 1,950 mm
  • Rear downforce wing: Shallower rear wing flap
  • Car weight: Minimum weight increased by 49 kg, up from 602 kg to 651 kg
  • Length: Minimum of 5,000 mm and maximum of 5,200 (in event of a "photo finish" the steering wheel is the point of reference for crossing the line rather than the nose)
  • Height: Nose and chassis height reduced (the height of the chassis has been reduced from 625 mm to 525 mm, whilst the height of the nose has been dramatically slashed from 550 mm to 185 mm).

Stock Racing[edit | edit source]

The Stock Series governed by the IRF is a stock car racing series. Stock Series races are held on oval counter-clockwise tracks. These races can prove highly technical and physically demanding on the drivers due to consistent high speeds and the length of the races which demand endurance on the part of the driver and his or her team.

Moto Racing[edit | edit source]

Enduro Racing[edit | edit source]

Organizational Structure[edit | edit source]

Regulations and standards[edit | edit source]

Championship points[edit | edit source]

Championships for each IRF series are granted both to drivers and constructors. Winning a championship follows a standardized system across all series governed by the IRF. Point are accumulated according to the finishing place of a driver in each race. Constructors accumulate points for both of their drivers while all drivers compete with each other regardless of team relationships. In the event that a race is ended before 75% of the race distance is covered, half points will be awarded according to the places at the time the race was ended. If the race fails to run 50% of the full length, no points will be awarded for that race. Attribution of points has changed several times over the the decades of the IRF's history, but currently follows the pattern below to the right:

Position 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Points 20 15 12 10 8 6 4 3 2 1

Super licencing[edit | edit source]

Competing in any of the top level racing series governed by the IRF requires the granting of a super licence. Super licences are granted after the accumulation of points through various national and international series recognized by the IRF as feeder series. Currently, the standard to secure a super licence is the accumulation of 50 points within a period of three years. Typically, achieving first, second, or third place within a junior international series will grant a full 50 points and similar results in a junior national series will grant 25 points. Lower place finishes will grant fewer points, but nevertheless count towards a super licence. Regardless of the level or series in which the points were accumulated, a super licence grants a driver the freedom to drive in any event in any IRF racing series so long as they have the support of a team. While exceedingly rare, driver-owned and operated teams are permitted, though potentially extremely cost prohibitive.

A super licence requires a nominal renewal fee of $5,000 annually. In addition, penalty points accumulated on a super licence increase the renewal fee by $2,500 per point. Penalty points may be assigned by IRF race stewards in response to especially egregious on-track violations in addition to other sanctions. Drivers who accumulate 12 penalty points within a year are subject to extreme sanctions, including possibly revocation of the license. Penalty points expire exactly one year from the date they were assigned.

Cars and technology[edit | edit source]

Specifications for vehicles within each series change frequently. The redrafting of specifications such as weight and size limits generally occur every five years in the Grand Prix Racing series and every seven years in Stock Racing. The IRF Moto Series has never gone through a complete redrafting in its history. Even so, each series will typically see two or three rule modifications every year in order to encourage innovation or to ban certain technologies which take away the reliance on the driver's ability or are unsafe.

Many technologies now common in consumer road cars have been developed in the top-level IRF series. These technologies include modern crumple zones, anti-lock braking system, kinetic energy recovery systems, and traction control, among others.