Kilikas Sea

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Kilikas Sea
File:Map highlighting the Kilikas Sea
Map of the Kilikas Sea
TypeSea
Primary inflowsLevantine Ocean
Primary outflowsCoscivian Sea
Basin countriesBurgundie, Insui, Kiravia, Kuhlfros
Surface area7,247,823 km2 (2,798,400 sq mi)
Average depth1,054 m (3,458 ft)
Max. depth6,357 m (20,856 ft)
Water volume7,610,214 km3 (1,825,787 cu mi)
IslandsIslas Nubes, Burgundie, Meridia, Wintergen
Settlements

The Kilikas Sea is a sea surrounded by the Kilikas Basin and is pass-through for waters from the Levantine Ocean to the Coscivian Sea, and then onto the Sea of Odoneru. The sea is bound by the Arctic in the north and Levantia in the south. The northern 40% of the sea freezes over from January to March. This much colder water, moving southward, conflicting with the warmer winds moving up the western Levantine coast from the equator in the southern Sea of Odoneru have caused a phenomenon known as the Kilikas Storm Belt, which encompasses the southwestern quadrant of the sea, particularly in the transitional waters of the Kilikas into the Coscivian Sea.

The Kilikas Sea has an average depth of 1,054 m (3,458 ft) and the deepest recorded point is 6,357 m (20,856 ft) about 650 nm due east of Wintergen, known as the Phistual Trench. Because of the Kilikas Storm Belt, the sea has only become an important route for merchants and travelers of in the last few centuries, following the development of safer maritime modes of transport. This has led to the development of slightly isolated cultures, like the Bergendii who otherwise would have been part of a larger Latinic civilization. The history of the Kilikas region is crucial to understanding the origins and development of Burgundie, Kirav, and the origins of globalization.

The countries with coastlines on the Kilikas Sea are Burgundie, Kiravia, Kuhlfros.

Name

History

Ancient civilisations

Lezevish (Basques), Impaxi (Picts), Prythonic Gaels, Brytonic Gaels, Finnics

Later civilizations Bergendii, Kiravian Coscivians

Middle Ages and empires

21st century and migrations

Geography

Extent

Oceanography

Coastal countries

Coastal cities

Subdivisions

  • Strait of Burgundie
  • Feradach Channel

Other seas

Other features

10 largest islands by area

Climate

Sea temperature

Geology

Tectonics and paleoenvironmental analysis

Desiccation and exchanges of flora and fauna

Paleoclimate

Ecology and biota

Environmental history

Natural hazards

Kilikas Storm Belt

Biodiversity

Invasive species

  • Basques

Arrival of new tropical species

Sea-level rise

Pollution

Shipping

Navigational Aides

Lighthouses
Weather Radar
AIS
Other

Tourism

Fishing

Overfishing

Aquaculture

Gallery

See also