LGBT rights around the world

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On international scale, there are notably many different legal policies regarding LGBT rights, varying greatly from nation to nation from legal same-sex marriage to the criminalization of homosexual acts.

List

Country Right to practice same-sex activity Right to freedom of expression Right to serve in military Legal protection against discrimination Legal recognition of same-sex relations Same-sex marriage Right to adoption Right to change sex and/or gender
Anta Carda Flag.png Anta Carda
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Same sex activity has always been condemned in the bible and the government of Anta Carda routinely charges those practicing same-sex activity with a life sentence or the death penalty. Any sort of same-sex expression outside of standard family relations is punishable by life sentence or death. Those in the LGBT community have never been allowed in the military and those trying to bypass the military restriction are charged with life sentence or the death sentence. Those in the LGBT community have never been protected by the law and are charged with life sentences or the death penalty when discovered to be LGBT. Those in the LGBT community have never had their same-sex relations recognized by law and are charged with life sentences or the death penalty when the relations are discovered. Marriage is strictly defined as between a man and a woman and are charged with life sentences or the death penalty when the relations are discovered. Right to adoption has always been strictly prohibited for those in the LGBT community and are charged with a life or death sentence if they are caught illegally adopting a child. Gender changes have always been strictly prohibited and those in the LGBT community are charged with a life or death sentence if they are caught illegally getting a gender change. Gender change is permitted solely for those who are born intersex, who can have their gender legally changed if it was defined incorrectly.
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Battganuur
Yes
No
Indeterminate
Yes
Yes
Indeterminate
No
Yes
Legalized in 1988 Certain activities, such as gay pride parades, remain banned. Not clear legal clearance Anti-discrimination laws put into effect in 2012. Civil partnerships recognized in 1999. Marriage is defined as between a man and a woman but not written on the constitution. Same-sex couples excluded from the 1990 Revised Adoption Act. Gender changes require written permission from authorized medical personnel. Private healthcare services are only institutions authorized performing such operations.
 Burgundie
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Legalized in 2005, but not prosecuted since 1905 Never against the law, but explicitly protected in the 1978 Assurances of Dignity Act Don't Ask Don't Tell ended in 2013, but when on deployment with Levantine Union missions, it is observed Anti-discrimination laws put into effect in the 1978 Assurances of Dignity Act. Enforcement of private sector is strict, but enforcement of the Levantine Catholic Church is lax which is problematic as the Church runs most of the social programs in Burgundie Legalized in 2005, but not prosecuted since 1905 Marriage is a religious institution and is not legally regulated. Civil unions were adopted in 1994 as a non-religious but legally recognized union. Legally, all marriages are civil unions, but the inverse is not true. Since the Levantine Catholic Church, and most other major churches in Burgundie do not recognize same-sex marriages, they are rare, but not outlawed. Same-sex couples are not legally banned from adopting children, but since most adoption agencies are administered by the Levantine Catholic Church, adoption is impossible. Burgundians are not legally banned from changing their sex or gender, but since most hospitals are administered by the Levantine Catholic Church, such surgeries are unheard of. Some wealthy individuals seeking sex changes or gender reassignment have gone overseas.
HekuFlagNew.png Caphiria
Partial
Yes
Yes
Yes
Partial
No
No
No
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Ceylonia
Yes
Yes
Yes
Partial
Yes
Partial
Yes
Yes
Legalized nationwide in 1791 via Escrito de Equitas (Writ of Equity) Legalized nationwide in 1940 Cartadania responsible for defense While discrimination is prohibited, the law is not always enforced in some areas. Since 2026. Legal in more populous departments. Others may recognize marriages from other departments, but may not recognize those "married" locally. Since 2026. Transgender people can change their legal gender and name before a notary without the need of surgeries or judicial order since 2026.
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Çyr
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Determined to be protected under the 1822 constitution. Explicitly protected under the Civil Rights Act of 1958. Since 1822 Since the 1816 consitution. Reiterated in 1822. Since 1822 Since 1958 Since the Amendment to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Since 1964 Gender expression remains absent from official documents though gender change is a valid reason for a name change. Physical sex may be officially changed at any time after surgery or HRT has begun.
 Diamavya
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Legalized in most of the nation in 1977, legalized in most Gabbenian provinces in 1982, legalized in AB and CV in 2012 after the Imperial March. While gay pride parades were banned in every province and public displays of affection were tolerated to an extent in all provinces except for AB, CZ, CV, and EX, the right to freedom of expression is now guaranteed to all people regardless of sexuality under the "Sexual Liberation Exact" implemented by the Executive Office of Amelia Al-Ahzmira on September 18th, 2036. Legalized in most of the nation in 1946, legalized in AB and CV in 1948 at the start of the Great War. Service couldn't be denied to any LGBTQ+ persons (guaranteed in 1978 for most of the nation, 1980 for CZ and EX, 1982 for CV, 1985 for AB), all hateful speech against LGBTQ+ persons remained unpunishable until the "Sexual Liberation Exact" was implemented by the Executive Office of Amelia Al-Ahzmira on September 18th, 2036. Recognized in most of the nation since 1980, 2009 in the Gabbenian provinces, 2010 in AB. Legal in most of the nation in 1980, 2009 in most of the Gabbenian provinces, and is illegal in CV and AB until the "Sexual Liberation Exact" was implemented by the Executive Office of Amelia Al-Ahzmira on September 18th, 2036. Excluded from adoption in 1970 under the Family Integrity Act until the "Sexual Liberation Exact" was implemented by the Executive Office of Amelia Al-Ahzmira on September 18th, 2036. Illegal under the Family Integrity Act of 1970 until the "Sexual Liberation Exact" was implemented by the Executive Office of Amelia Al-Ahzmira on September 18th, 2036.
Cartadania Cartadania
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Legalized nationwide in 1791 Legalized nationwide in 1791, legalized again in 1940 Since 1801 Bans all anti-gay discrimination
Pathologization or attempted treatment of sexual orientation by mental health professionals illegal since 1985
Since 1989. Legal in central states (AL, SG, VA, & VE) since 1960. Nationwide since 1989. Since 1989. Transgender people can change their legal gender and name before a notary without the need of surgeries or judicial order since 1990.
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Kiravia
Partial
Yes
Yes
Yes
Partial
No
No
No
Same-sex relations formally illegal (though decriminalised) in some states, statutes are not enforced. Administrative discharges from the Army discontinued 21190. Homosexuality tacitly permitted in the Navy since time immemorial. Nondiscrimination laws gradually adopted during and after Kirosocialism. Gender-neutral civil unions are offered in Kiygrava, Fariva, Cascada, Venèra, Argévia, Vôtaska, and Asperidan, but are not functionally equivalent to marriages in all respects. Neither the federal government nor any federal subject recognises same-sex marriage Adoption per se nonexistent in Kiravia. Same-sex couples cannot apply to become joint guardians of wards, though an individual partner can be granted legal guardianship of a related child. Fariva, Kastera, Cascada, Argévia, Valtéra, the Melian Isles, and Sydona allow gender changes with sex-reassignment surgery and a court order
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Ralvithja
Yes
Partial
Yes
No
Partial
Partial
Yes
No
The institutes do not care for what happens behind closed doors, as long as it is not harmful. Although the church would like to ban these activities, they do not have enough influence over the more powerful institutes. The people of Ralvithja are free to say whatever they like, however the institute they are a part of is responsible for making sure that they do not take part in any kind of dangerous activity, and can therefore, if they wish, ban certain speech. Most of the institutes that ban all LGBT expression are the ones influenced by the church. The institute of war only cares for a recruits will to fight for the nation. The culture in Ralvithja does not protect anyone from discrimination, they follow an understanding where if someone holds a bias against you that is a challenge that you should fight against. Failing to change their mind is weakness. All legal recognition of relations is based on ones institute. The more christian institutes usually only recognize relations between a man and a woman. Any official marriage is handled by the institute one is part of. Most christian institutes ban marriages that are not between a man and a woman. Adoption is not limited by any factor except how capable a couple is judged to be to raise a child. The largest factor in adoption is therefore success. The Norse culture has always put the two genders and their roles in the spotlight. Men are not prevented from acting the woman nor are woman prevented from acting the man. However to change ones sex is to state that this is not enough among within the Nordic faith. This is an insult to the gods and not allowed. The christian side of things holds different but similarly negative views on the subject.
UrceaRepublic.png Urcea
Partial
Partial
Partial
No
No
No
No
No
Sodomy laws are on the books, but individual prosecutions for it are rare. Gay pride parades and expression against hetero-normative relationships in media are banned. Depictions of homosexuality in media are banned. Don't Ask - Don't Tell is strictly enforced. Employers can fire employees under cause of "breach of good character". Non-religious unions are not recognized in Urcea, and none of the major established religions in Urcea recognize homosexual unions. Marriage is defined by the government as a union before the eyes of one's God between a man and a woman. Participation in a same-sex relationship is cause to deny adoption based on "breach of good character". Sex-reassignment surgery is banned, and doctors performing it are guilty of a felony. It is legally impossible to change one's gender.
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Mellifera
Partial
Partial
Partial
No
No
No
No
No
Sodomy, which includes homosexuality, is outside of the legislative purview of the commonwealths and federal government as a religious offense. However, homosexuality is routinely condemned by religious and civil authorities, and open homosexuals face excommunication and social ostracism. Most media distributed on airwaves, by theatrics, in film, via the internet, or in print must be declared nihil obstat (free of error regarding faith and morals) by the Levantine Church before it can be approved for release. Hence, content promoting homosexual or otherwise deviant behavior does not enter the public sphere. However, media discussing homosexuality, portraying homosexuals, or depicting homosexuality for artistic purposes in a non-erotic fashion is generally permitted. Pride parades and other expressions of support for homosexuality, collective and individual, are illegal union-wide as "contrary to public order and societal health" under the Sedition Act of 1975. No law has been established regarding the service of homosexuals in the military. Accordingly homosexuals are free to serve, so long as they abide by the code of military justice and military regulation, including a policy of "don't ask, don't tell." Sexually deviant individuals benefit from the same protections as other citizens when faced with criminal attack. "Hate crimes" do not exist as a distinct offense under Melliferan law. Religious grievances are considered justifiable in termination of employment. Civil unions "contrary to the moral law," including homosexual unions, are not recognized by the commonwealths or federal government, and are prohibited under the constitution. Civil marriage does not exist in Mellifera, and marriage licensing is the domain of the Levantine Church and recognized minority religious organizations, none of which permit homosexual marriages. Religious bodies other than the Levantine Church are subject to some civil regulation, and under Melliferan law recognized religious organizations are barred from sanctioning such unions and organizations which do permit them may not be recognized. The Levantine Church has complete autonomy in regards to orphanages, and has total discretion in accepting and denying applications to adopt. Federal statute forbids other religious organizations from allowing adoptions by practicing homosexuals. The Levantine Church, the primary provider of healthcare in Mellifera, considers gender dysphoria to be a mental disorder best treated with therapy. The state does not legally recognize gender transitions, and prohibits non-Church run hospitals from providing them.