Development of armored warfare in Burgundie

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For much of its history Burgundie has relied on its neighbors Kistan and Kuhlfros for landbased defense. Following its independence in 1812 Burgundie entered a world where armored warfare was alone a realm of the sea. However, that changed during the War of Faskano Strait when Kirav fielded a small number of mobile pill boxes. While the war formally ended the Kiro-Burgundian Wars, and the nautical arms race between Kirav and Burgundie, it sparked a global armored warfare arms race that exploded less than twenty years later with the outbreak of the Great War.

Chariots

Upon the arrival of the first Latinic settlers a clear advantage was demonstrated in their use of chariots, over their Feinii, Impaxi, and Levzeish foe. The chariot remained a staple in Burgundian armies until the 13th century, when under the rule of the Kistani, the chariot fell out of favor as inconsistent with the Kistani methods of war.

Called the carrus, the early Latinic war chariot had a wicker carriage, two wheels and was pulled by a single horse. The platform was large enough for only a single man and was often used by a commander to give commands quickly. After the further development of the chariot to the conditions in northern Levantia, the Bergendus biga, a heavier wooden chariot for two men, pulled by two horses became popular. The first man was the driver and the second a warrior trained both in archery or in melee weapons. These chariot warriors were revered in northern Levantia for the skill and adeptness. In the 10th century, there remained a few recorded instances of chariots with the carriage being in front of the horses and a plow being fitted to the front to bust a hole in the enemy lines for cavalry to advance through and attack the rear of the opposing force, but this was not a common practice.

The development of the quadriga inpulsa a four horse-drawn, four-wheeled battle platform for a driver and up to 6 men was expensive but popular in the 12th century. It was as effective a psychological weapon as it was a weapon of war, but the amount of training required for these types of warriors and the advent of better polearms made them an impractical expense when the Kistani's took over the land-based defense of Burgundie.

Punthite Colonial Warfare

War Elephants

Camels

Armored Cars

Tachanka for the Burgundian Grand Crona Trading Company during the New Burgundie Secession War.

Tanks

Halftracks

Armored Fighting Vehicles

MRVs

Autonomous Vehicles