Geography of Burgundie

From IxWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Burgundie is made up of a series of mainland counties and electorate counties on the continent of Levantia, a capital island, a "home" island approximately 850 kilometers off of its northern shore and "trade" islands scattered across Greater Ixnay. Due to the historical importance of the maritime realm, the sea around and between the landed counties and the islands are also considered as much a part of Burgundie as its terra firma.

The capital island consists of the Electorate of Burgundie and is the administrative and historical center of the republic. It is located 156 miles north of the Levantine northern coast. The "home" island of Wintergen is located 855 kilometers northeast of the Electorate of Burgundie in the midst of the Kilikas Sea. It is considered a home island because following its occupation in 1823, most of the Kiravian settlers left and the island was colonized by the Burgundians.

The trade islands of AyerSee, Nyö, Sodermark, ... and Sturmhavn are scattered throughout Greater Ixnay.

Climate

The summer's months are moderately warm, though summer is rather short and rainfall is spread through the year. The frost-free growing season ranges from 90 days on the island of Wintergen to 140 days along the western coast of Dübenneck.

Along coastal Dübenneck, and the islands of Burgundie and Wintergen the same humid continental prevails (Dfa), though summers are warm to hot, winters are shorter, and there is less snowfall (especially in the coastal areas where it is often warmer), with the general exception of the higher elevations and other normally cooler locations. Cities like Kongerhus, Dorft, and NordHalle receive 35 to 45 inches (890 to 1,140 mm) of snow annually. Summers can occasionally be hot and humid, with high temperatures between 90 and 100 °F (32 and 38 °C). Summer thunderstorms are common between June and August.

Insular Burgundie

Topography of Insular and Levantine Burgundie

This includes the islands of the Isle of Burgundie, Nauta Normand, and Wintergen.

Ultmar

Geographically, Ultmar consists of a series of defining features. From west to east they generally fall into the Paulian Coastal Plain, the Paulus Peninsula, the Southern Spine, the Burgundian Caldera and the Eastern Plain.

Martilles

Martilles is a Humid continental clmate with hot, humid summers and cold winters. Februarius, the coldest average month in Martilles has a mean temperature of -4°C (24.8°F) and its summer season, Proserpina through Julhet, have a mean temperature of 18°C (64.4°F). In addition, onshore sea breezes can reduce daytime temperatures along the coast by 3 to 6°C (5 to 10°F). Precipitation falls evenly throughout the year, with slightly more falling during Julhet and Auristre than in any other month. Most of the province receives between 820 and 1,500 mm (32 and 59 in) a year. Severe droughts are uncommon. Thunderstorms occur frequently in summer, and in winter there is generally light snowfall, with snow typically falling between the Ides of Guili and the kalends of Pasqua. Hurricane season lasts from the Ides of Iuniores until the kalends of Sang, but the month of Auristre is the most active. The month’s name Auristre, means of the hurricane, and it brings an average of three tropical cyclones within impact distance of Martilles each year. A hurricane strength storm strikes Martilles on average once every 5 years and a major hurricane once every 25 years. The last Category 3+ hurricane to hit the province was in 2026, Hurricane Marta. The 2019 hurricane seasons was particularly devastating with a Category 2 hurricane skirting the coast causing intense coastal flooding. It was followed three weeks later by a post tropical storm stalling over the interior for four days, then a week later by a Category 1 hurricane passing directly across the province. Martilles is in the Paulian Coastal Plain physiographic region. The province has 2,420 km (1,504 mi) of rivers and streams and 2,954 acres of lakes and ponds. It has Xkm (Xmi) of ocean coastline.

Martillian Hydrology

Its primary fluvial feature, the Lesser Sarbeliard, flows into the Sea of Odoneru from the western slopes of the Southern Spine. The Lesser Sarbeliard Estuary is the provinces primary waterway and concludes at the port city provincial capital Dormanshire. The northern border of Martilles extends to the midpoint of the Lesser Sarbeliard as determined by the 1884 mean low water line. Except for the Lesser Sarbeliard, most rivers and streams in Martilles are only navigable by small water craft. Oceangoing vessels can travel up the Lesser Sarbeliard as far as the Port of Dormanshire, and barges can traverse most of the lower part of the river, ending only at Belveil Falls, where the river’s alpine course enters the lower plains. Small barge traffic can also operate on the widened courses of the Saint Elodie River between the industrial towns of Marchelle St. Elodie and Neucort. Since its colonization by Latinic peoples in the first century CE, the rivers and streams have been dammed, redirected, and otherwise altered to be used for milling, hydrological power, and commercial purposes. Martilles hosts an extensive aquifer system which is utilized to support its agricultural, commercial and industrial endeavors. The province has 2,420 km (1,504 mi) of rivers and streams and 2,954 acres of lakes and ponds. There are no large lakes but there are numerous small lakes, ponds, and reservoirs which are often used for fishing, recreational activities, public water storage, and hydrological power. Martilles has X km (Xmi) of ocean coastline, all affronting the Sea of Odoneru. The shoreline, which includes all bays and inlets is Xkm (Xmi) long and sustains considerable saltwater marshes behind long sandy barrier beaches. The Saint Elodie River is the only breakwater in the southern barrier beaches. The chief water features behind these barrier beaches are the Saint Elodie Bay, the Great Vinrgues Bay and the Lesser Vinrgues Bay.

Martillian Flora

Ref. New England/Acadian forests

A virgin forested area along the Lesser Sarbeliard riverine border between Martilles and Kistan

The growing season, which is the period between the last killing frost in the spring and the first killing frost in the fall, is generally between 100 and 200 days long. Destructive frosts seldom occur later than the Ides of Proserpina or before the Nones of Torbada. Martilles has predominantly hyper productive Andisol soils. These were formed from the super eruption that created the Burgundian Caldera around 5000 BC. Underneath this soil is a firm bedding of coastal alluvium and the colluvium from the Southern Spine. The agricultural and logging sectors have long taken advantage of these rich soils, but the shorter growing season limits the scale of commercial farming and some areas have been totally stripped of their nutrients over time. The dominant agricultural products of the region are potatoes, corn, apples, cranberries, and blueberries in ascending order of harvest volume. There is a minor vineyard boom as climate change has made the planting of wine grapes more feasible, but the predominant product is ice wine which has a limited audience and is primarily enjoyed within the province.

Balsam fir, paper birch, and white spruce dominate the canopy. Due to over forestation the cypress population, particularly the northern white cedars native to the region, is almost extinct in Martilles. The presence of paper birch groves are typical in areas where cedar stands were over farmed as it is a successional species. Through human intervention (logging) the forests of Martilles have over the last few hundred years changed from a predominately coniferous forest zone to a northern extremity of the Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests of central Levantia. The eastern larch, black spruce, eastern white pine, and to a small extent the eastern hemlock are common pine varietals. The Canadian yew is common along the wetlands of Martilles, but its growth has not been prioritized in favor of other conifers since the 17th century.

Burgundian Latium

Burgundian Latium is constituted of the provinces of Adtaran, Bonavix, Cashen, Drusla, Eagaria, Esquinia, and Pumbria.

Flordeterra

Flordeterra is constituted of the provinces of Equitorial Burgundie, Hoheseen, Monsunboch, and Neu Burgund.

Other Overseas Territories

Physical Geography of Burgundie

Because of its disparate locations, Burgundie has many different forms of geography.

Insular Burgundie

Topography of Insular and Levantine Burgundie

This includes the islands of the Isle of Burgundie, Nauta Normand, and Wintergen.

Ultmar

Geographically, Ultmar consists of a series of defining features. From west to east they generally fall into the Paulus Peninsula, the Southern Spine, the Burgundian Caldera and the Eastern Plain.

Burgundian Latium

Burgundian Latium is constituted of the provinces of Adtaran, Bonavix, Cashen, Drusla, Eagaria, Esquinia, and Pumbria.

Flordeterra

Flordeterra is constituted of the provinces of Equitorial Burgundie, Hoheseen, Monsunboch, and Neu Burgund.

Other Overseas Territories

See Also